Out of Hours

The out of hours telephone service is now provided by NHS 111.

The surgery telephone lines are open Monday to Friday 8.00 am until 6.00 pm. The out of hours period is from 6pm to 8am on weekdays and all day during weekends and bank holidays.

If you require urgent medical assistance which cannot wait until the surgery re–opens you should call NHS 111 on 111. These calls are free from both landlines and mobiles.  The advisors at 111 will assess your condition and direct you to the most appropriate service.  This could be A&E, an out–of–hours doctor, an urgent care centre or a walk–in centre, a community nurse, an emergency dentist or a late–opening chemist.

If you have a life threatening medical emergency please dial 999.

Minor Injuries and Walk in Centres

Story Street Walk–in Centre, Wilberforce Health Centre, 6–10 Story Street, Hull, HU1 3SA
01482 335 180 (8.00am to 8.00pm Monday to Sunday including Bank Holidays
Beverley Community Hospital, Swinemoor Lane, Beverley, HU17 0FA
01482 886 600 (9.00am to 5.00 pm Monday to Friday
Goole and District Hospital, Woodland Avenue, DN14 6RX
01405 720 720 (Open 24 hours a day Monday to Sunday)


NHS 111 service

111 is the NHS non-emergency number. It’s fast, easy and free. Call 111 and speak to a highly trained adviser, supported by healthcare professionals. They will ask you a series of questions to assess your symptoms and immediately direct you to the best medical care for you.


NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Calls are free from landlines and mobile phones.

When to use 111

You should use the NHS 111 service if you urgently need medical help or advice but it’s not a life–threatening situation.

Call 111 if:

  • you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergency
  • you think you need to go to A&E or need another NHS urgent care service
  • you don't know who to call or you don't have a GP to call
  • you need health information or reassurance about what to do next
  • For less urgent health needs, contact your GP or local pharmacist in the usual way.

If a health professional has given you a specific phone number to call when you are concerned about your condition, continue to use that number.

For immediate, life–threatening emergencies, continue to call 999.

How does it work?

The NHS 111 service is staffed by a team of fully trained advisers, supported by experienced nurses and paramedics. They will ask you questions to assess your symptoms, then give you the healthcare advice you need or direct you straightaway to the local service that can help you best. That could be A&E, an out–of–hours doctor, an urgent care centre or a walk–in centre, a community nurse, an emergency dentist or a late–opening chemist.

If NHS 111 advisers think you need an ambulance, they will immediately arrange for one to be sent to you.

Calls to 111 are recorded. All calls and the records created are maintained securely, and will only be shared with others directly involved with your care.